14 Weeks Pregnant – Pregnancy Week by Week

Your pregnancy

Since it became evident that you are pregnant, you may now start to daydream about your future days. It is normal that you worry about a tonne of things, but it would be the best for you to focus on taking care of yourself. Nausea, finally, completely ends! You may have constipation in this period because the uterus starts to press the muscles. The line on your stomach skin that connects the pubic bone and the umbilicus becomes darker – it’s called the black line. It appears due to the hormone activity and will disappear after the pregnancy.

Veins on your breasts are quite visible and areola area around the nipples increases – it’s obvious that your body is getting ready for breastfeeding.

Baby development

The baby can now move its head, mouth, hands, joints, legs, and feet; even its toes. The neck is longer and stronger; and a few weeks ago, the baby’s chin had to lean directly on the chest. Your doctor can now here the heart beating more clearly on the ultrasound, and it is still twice as fast as in adults, around 160 beats per minute.

Eyes continue to develop and move, and ears are closer to their final position. The amniotic fluid, a beautiful and beneficial substance, is created every three hours. It is known by now that it consists of a baby’s urine, but the exact formula is still unknown.

The baby swims in it, which deprives all mother’s movements. The amniotic fluid fulfills the respiratory tract of the baby before birth. Hence, the presence of this fluid becomes increasingly important, both for feeding the child and as a barrier for some infections. External organs are still developing, but now it’s easier to see a baby’s gender. The length of the baby is now over 3 inches, and it weighs 0.11 pounds.

Tip for this week

So far, you’ve probably already done a prenatal test. Depending on the results of this test, a gynecologist can recommend you to do an amniocentesis. In addition to this analysis, there is a cordocentesis, and both have a task to identify precisely every possible chromosomal disorder. However, both analyses are highly invasive, and in a minimum percentage can cause miscarriage.

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Proud father of Nina, a beautiful little girl. And hopefully of another baby soon :)

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